Friday, July 27, 2012

Trail Camera Time!

So after writing about setting up a tree stand, I think it would be nice to write about trial camera's! I kind of chuckle at this one just because this time of the year almost every hunter who blogs is writing about trail camera success or failure.  With that being said, any advice or opinions on setting up trail cameras is appreciated.  I started this blog not only to share my experience, but also to learn from those who are willing to share what they know.

Point 1 - Get a memory card or a picture viewer!!! - For the last few years I have used my Trail Cameras and have gotten a few good pictures here and there.  The times I haven't gotten good pictures is not because of the camera, but more so because of myself not setting them up right or not knowing where to place them.  This year I have used the same two cameras, but invested in some memory cards so that I could view my pictures in the field.  This allowed me to make sure I was set up right before I left my cameras for a few weeks taking pictures of nothing but moving branches and grass.

Point 2 - Be familiar with your deer. - It is important to read up on recent deer activity and know how the deer are moving at certain times of the year, but it is also important to take what you read into your area and see if it applies!  For example my friend from Wired to Hunt posted information about the different ways deer deal with the heat during the summer.  This information was very useful when I set up my trail cameras in hopes of getting a few pictures of deer in my area.  Instead of focusing on food sources this time of the year, I focused on the water in my hunting areas and set up my trail cameras close to the rivers and streams.  Later in the year It is hard to find these same deer in this location, but knowing that this is where they are during the extreme heat helped me get some good pictures and know that these deer are somewhere in my area.

Point 3  - Leave it be - The last thing that you want to do is disrupt your area.  Even though it may not be the season for hunting it is important that you treat your hunting area as if you are an intruder at all times.  I myself, like to set up my camera when I know a storm is coming in.  This will often produce quite a few pictures because of the wind or rail moving sticks and grass around, but I feel it quickly gets rid of my scent I left behind.  Leaving your trail camera for a longer period of time will produce more accurate pictures of what is really in your area.

Point 4 - Placement - Of course you have to know where to set up your camera to get pictures of your deer.  Avoid putting the camera right in the sight of the deer, or set it up so that the flash is off so that it does not disturb the normal travel pattern of the deer.  Try to find a trail that is well used and set up the camera far enough away from the trail to get a good pictures as well as setting up the camera looking down the trail instead of a side view.  This will help produce more pictures especially if the deer are traveling through the area at faster speeds.

These are a few of the random tips I have for setting up trail cameras, but it is important for everyone to know that every area is different and that you need to figure out what works in your area.  Below are a few of my most recent pictures from my two cameras.  I hope you enjoy!


Trail Camera Pic

Trail Camera Pic

Trail Camera Pic

Trail Camera Pic

Trail Camera Pic









To check out some awesome trail Camera's check out http://www.minox.com/index.php?id=5613&L=2